The day Glastonbury came to Lincolnshire!

Conscious of revealing my age, does anyone else remember when Glastonbury came to Lincolnshire?

bardney festival line up

Actually,  the hamlet of Tupholme near Bardney to be precise! It was the bank holiday weekend at the end of May 1972, fields full of cars, tents, caravans and VW camper vans. The event – The Great Western Express Festival l fronted by a consortium led by the late Sir Stanley Baker (actor) and Lord Harlech and with a line up to envy any current day event. With the likes of Rory Gallagher, Nazareth, Roxy Music, Wishbone Ash, Helen Reddy, The Strawbs, The Faces, Spencer Davis, Lindisfarne, Average White Band, Slade, The Beach Boys, Genesis, Status Quo,  Don McLean; Humble Pie,and Joe Cocker, the three day event was a boy’s dream 12th birthday present!

With the festival being held on farmland worked by my grandparents and uncle’s, access to ALL area’s was a status granted  to my sister and I. Whilst our home was in Bardney, where reaction was divided about all the anticipated damage and it’s about time something good came to the area, we stayed that weekend at our grandparents home on the Tupholme farm. What an experience. Stanley Baker’s son Martin had breakfast with us each morning and used to turn up with a tray of yoghurts. Surprising what silly little bits you remember. Like his father he was a gentleman and treated my gran like royalty. Sir Stanley called at the house daily with some item or another, be it flowers, chocolates or bottled refreshment or a mixture of all, but stayed in a Billy Smarts Circus ‘caravan’ – well a mobile home to die for – parked in the entrance to Tupholme Hall farmyard. I was privileged to visit his caravan and to a boy of 12 it was like nothing I had ever seen before and I guess never will again.

Then there was the festival itself. WOW! I was allowed to enter the back stage area and introduced to various acts as they came off stage or were going on, names I had no idea who they were or how famous they were or would be in the music industry. But the highlight had to be being on the back of the stage on Sunday 28th as my 12th birthday treat, whilst Slade performed their set. What a memory! BRILLIANT! Even now it gives me goose bumps thinking about being so close to the band and then at the end Noddy Holder shaking my hand wishing me a happy birthday and asking whether they’d performed well enough!!!! Errr, what do you reply to that? I know I babbled out a few words but was so excited I know I wouldn’t have made any sense. To see all of this going on in the surrounds of our childhood Tupholme Hall grounds was unbelievable and what dreams are made of.

I could write on about many other memories of that weekend, but I know Ian will be counting the amount of text, so I’ll end here! But thanks Noddy and the guys for that day of wonderful memories and thanks to Martin for being so kind to our family and giving us all wonderful memories of Tupholme’s own Pop Festival.

Reg Burrell

Web sites; http://www.ukrockfestivals.com/Great-Western-fest.html or  http://sladestory.blogspot.co.uk/1972/05/lincoln-festival-great-western-express.htm

Reminiscence of Woodhall Spa.

“I’ve never lived in Woodhall Spa but it has always had a special place in my heart, We use to come to the Kinema in the woods to see films as children and now go to the Petwood every year to celebrate my mother’s birthday. The most important memory I have of Woodhall Spa is quite recent – Seven yekinemaoldars ago I introduced my now husband to my parents for the first time. He was so nervous he hardly spoke and I can remember my dad giving him a bit of a hard time. Now of course they are the best of friends!”

Rebecca Bewick

Dad was a POW……….

cottage museum session

3 yrs ago Gill set up the display for the Cottage Museum. Gill had a lot of stuff fro her father was a POW so Gill displayed the postcards drawn in the camp drawn by the actor Michael Goodliff. This all went into the cabinet at the museum – Someone came to the museum 6 weeks later a gentleman left information about his father who was in the same camp. Gill got in contact and it turned out that the gentleman was a professional musician as was Gill’s father and they knew each other. The gentleman had notebooks and images relating to her father. There are inverted British Isles as clouds in the sky of the postcards and that is how the gentleman (from Yorkshire) who visited the museum. The camp was not liberated until 1945 – It is funny how things come about.

Gill Noble

Going to the air raid shelter

airraidshelterAunt came with steel curlers and an attached case with jewellery in. The street shelters has a square painted at one end and had a nelson loo which smelt horrible. We just sat until the all clear went and then my father took my Grandmother.

Ann vividly remembers the bombing in Coventry
Father on a chair looking over the garden wall and saying to the man next door that we are at war.
Black outs – Making blackouts and sticky paper on the windows to stop the glass shattering.
We then had a Morrison one indoors as Ann’s grandfather had arthritis.

 

The Liberty Bodice………

liberty bodice

Ann can remember her bodice well – The worst thing about the bodice was the rubber buttons which you fastened to your stockings you had to bend double to fix them to the bodice. The buttons also smelt of rubber and were really nasty. If you were lucky you got fine stockings – Lyle ones with a seam at the back but you had to get those under the counter.

Ann Holton

My treasured Bud Vase

Margaret’s husband mother was called Priscilla and his aunt was Grace –

bud vase

She was named after Grace Maple (Lady Wigel). Margaret’s Husband use to garden at the Petwood and the W were very generous to their staff. When Grace was born, Lady W to be Godmother which she accepted to Grace Odling and she gave the vase as a Christening present.

To Margaret the vase means – “It’s lovely to have something that takes me back to the time when Woodhall Spa was in it heyday and to know the heyday”. “It’s not mine it is my daughter’s”.

The vase will go on Margaret’s daughter’s wedding cake if she gets married.

Margaret

Colour TV ? It will never catch on!!

colour tv

As a young child in the early 1960s I remember eagerly watching all the childhood favourites such as Andy Pandy, The Woodentops and Bill and Ben on TV all in glorious black and white. I then found out thatmy Aunty and Uncle who lived in Bicker were investing in a new colourTV set – one of the first anywhere in the area. The family eagerly gathered around this rather bulky TV set to view our favourite programmes for the very first time in full multi-colour. There was great excitement and with bated breath we turned the TV on. It crackled into life, a misty fog appeared and gradually faded and, yes, there was colour – the whole world of TV was indeed very colourful – every shade of orange under the sun! So, it was back to the black and white TV for quite a while after that and we all agreed – the idea of colour TV would never catch-on!

Roy Pell – Bicker 

Living in Sleaford……………

sleaford
Lincolnshire is very interesting there is lots of history lots of lovely walks Lincoln town is very interesting with the church. I like living in Sleaford lots of lovely walks in Sleaford I have lived in Sleaford for 19 years and find it very interesting.

 

Patricia Gould

Rambling in the woods

conkersI remember as a small a child regularly visiting Belton Tower Near Grantham. I used to go with my Sister and Father when it was summer and in Autumn. In summer it was lovely to look over the fields and just enjoyed the feeling of freedom because there was so much space to run about and play. There was also sheep there to see which was a novelty.

We also used to explore in the trees there too. When we went in the Autumn we would go collecting various bits and pieces such as pine cones and conkers.

Louise Moore

Going to Boston by “bus”

boston bus

My mother used to get me to wait at the bottom of the garden to keep a look out for the ‘bus’ to Boston. When I  saw it coming I would run up the path shouting to let her know. She would then put on her coat, hat and scarf and walk down to meet it.

The bus was drawn by a horse and took ages to get us into town and back!

Image is of a similar “bus”

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